Teatime with Godzilla

This is a small expression of an independent conciousness on the internet.

Please do not hesitate to supply links/sources to the images I post which I forget to give credit for.

Unless otherwise noted, I take no credit for creating any of the images posted here.

innocenttmaan:

There are some people out there that still believe that animals are just dumb beasts, but the unlikely animal friendships I’ve gathered here will prove that they are capable of feeling love and compassion just like we are.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

paleoillustration:

Wading by Luke Mancini:
"Inspired by egrets in the creek between my place and work, a non-avian cousin enjoys foraging in a somewhat more natural environment. I had the tail in a more traditionally ‘dinosaur’y curve for most of the process but actually quite like the straight (more accurate) version in the end."

paleoillustration:

Wading by Luke Mancini:

"Inspired by egrets in the creek between my place and work, a non-avian cousin enjoys foraging in a somewhat more natural environment. I had the tail in a more traditionally ‘dinosaur’y curve for most of the process but actually quite like the straight (more accurate) version in the end."

(via fuckyeahdinoart)

mikasavela:

One of the only two existing solar furnaces in the world completed in Uzbekistan in 1987 and showcased in Архитектура СССР (Architecture USSR), Issue 3-4, 1988. The grainy photos of the furnace in the landscape make it seem like an etching of an ancient temple, an image heightened by Helios in his chariot, seen in the section drawing.

(Some modern day photos and info at English Russia.)

(via architectureofdoom)

crownedrose:

Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

(via lostbeasts)